Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes

By , March 17, 2011

Dr. Steve Parker is a leading expert on the Mediterranean diet. With two decades experience treating patients with diabetes, pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome, Dr. Parker has developed a modified version of the Mediterranean diet. His new book Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes: The Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet provides a comprehensive overview of the diet.

Dr. Parker is no stranger to the low carb lifestyle, and has seen dramatic health improvement from it in some of his patients. His low-carb Mediterranean diet is an attempt to marry the heart-healthy benefits of the traditional Mediterranean diet, with its emphasis on natural foods, omega-3 rich olive oil and plenty of complex carbs, with the superior blood sugar control and weight loss of a low carbohydrate lifestyle.

How can these two diets, seemingly incompatible, come together without compromising both? I was concerned that Dr. Parker might give a pass to “complex carbs” in the same way the American Diabetic Association does. But he doesn’t mince any words about carbohydrates:

We’ve done an atrocious job for type 2 diabetics and prediabetics.

We’ve recommended they eat precisely what their bodies can’t handle: carbohydrates. We’ve urged them to take poison: carbohydrates. We’ve cooperated with the drug companies to encourage diabetics to eat foods that increase drug company profits: carbohydrates.

Dr. Parker relates that how, over the past 10 years, the medical literature and his clinical experience has led to a change in his thinking, and better treatment of his patients.

The book is a medium format, 5.5″ x 9″, quality paperback with 216 pages. It is economically priced at $16.95. The last 26 pages are devoted to a list of print and on-line resources, an annotated bibliography complete with URLs to medical journal articles, and a five page index.



Dr. Parker’s low-carb Mediterranean diet follows a familiar pattern: a very low carb starting phase called the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet (KMD), and a maintenance phase dubbed the Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet (LCMD). He includes a week of meals suitable for the KMD, with a list of additional foods that can be added, slowly, once weight loss and blood sugar levels are in control.

What is different about Dr. Parker’s book? He includes a robust list of drugs and possible interactions during the ketogenic phase of the diet. Other specific recommendations for diabetics, such as the chapter devoted to the dangers of hypoglycemia, are a must read for someone looking to control blood sugar via diet. And I found the book eminently readable. Dr. Parker writes in a conversational style, explaining terms in a way that does not come across as condescending.

His chapter on “Daily Life with Low-Carb Eating” addresses several issues, including “cheating”. What do you do when presented with that Cinnabon you can’t resist? His answer is surprising, but workable. If you must indulge, compensate by replacing a meal with the treat, adding extra exercise or medication, or reverting to the KMD diet for a few days after. While purists will insist they never cheat, I did exactly this on a recent European cruise, and came back weighing less than when we set sail. (As Dr. Parker points out, you have to know your limits; just as a reformed alcoholic never tastes alcohol again, some “carbohydrate addicts” can’t afford to cheat.)

Dr. Parker’s easy approach to developing a reasonable exercise program might get me started in that direction. (Niacin, taken to help lower my triglyceride levels, also increases insulin resistance, and the antidote for that is exercise.) I loathe exercise, but Dr. Parker’s no-nonsense approach to the subject may get me walking in the evenings.

I found another personal benefit. While not diabetic, I do struggle with blood sugar control, and have been diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (now abated with low carb living). We often get stuck in our choice of foods, and simply removing carbs from our standard diet can get boring. Dr. Parker notes that the popularity of the standard Mediterranean diet includes the benefit of both taste and variety. Adopting a low carb Mediterranean diet approach could introduce some variety to what has become a routine diet. And as my wife tells me, variety in everything in life, except partners, is a good thing.

Disclaimer: Dr. Parker provided a complimentary review copy of the book, but did not attach any editorial restrictions to the review. Low Carb Daily is also listed as an on-line resource in the Resources section of the book.

Folders theme by Themocracy